unvarnished

Has America Surrendered?

fggam:

Has America surrendered?

Many are wondering at the meaning of the faded American flags mysteriously hung over the Brooklyn bridge overnight. White flags, which are symbols of surrender, flew from poles on the stone supports atop the famed bridge that connects Brooklyn and Manhattan over the East River. Authorities have yet to determine who did it or why.

American Flag of Surrender 2The pale flags raise an interesting…

View On WordPress

Sorry, I remember LBJ, Jimmy Carter & Ronald Reagan. The first two, who both had their failings, were far better men (& presidents) than that former B-actor.

Are you calling for Armed Rebellion in the name of Christ? Then don’t invoke General Washington. He was not sanctimonious & favored a moderate, unprejudiced view of religion.

And we Texans know that Travis lost at the Alamo. Sam Houston knew how to beat Santa Ana—and it was not with empty drama. Alas, we Texans also know that hatred of President Obama usually has racist roots.

Shame on you.

ancientart:

The interior of the hypogeum of the Volumnus family. This Etruscan tomb is located in Ponte San Giovanni in central Italy, and thought to date to approximately the 3rd century BCE.
Photo taken by CyArk.

ancientart:

The interior of the hypogeum of the Volumnus family. This Etruscan tomb is located in Ponte San Giovanni in central Italy, and thought to date to approximately the 3rd century BCE.

Photo taken by CyArk.


"For freedom in the world, subscribe to the National Loan at the National Bank of Credit."

"For freedom in the world, subscribe to the National Loan at the National Bank of Credit."

(Source: fuckyeahwwiipropaganda)

minutemanworld:

So I wanted to talk about this image because it’s being used on a regular basis to promote bad history. 

This is not a depiction of Colonel Tye, an escaped slave who joined the British and became greatly feared for his raids.

Nor is it a depiction of the regiment of black soldiers raised by Lord Dunmore, the governor of Virginia. This regiment is known as the Ethiopian Regiment and they were dressed like this.

It’s not a depiction of a Black Loyalist either, as the cover art for this book implies:

In fact, it’s not a depiction of a black soldier in North America at all, despite the cover image on this book*:

The image is a cropped detail from The Death of Major Pierson, January 6, 1781 by John Singleton Copley. The painting depicts the Battle of Jersey, which was only tangentially related to the war in America. On January 5, 1781 the French landed forces on the island of Jersey with the intent to capture the island and stop it’s use as a base for privateers and raiders. The British had 16 dead, 85 wounded, the French had 86 dead, 72 wounded, and 456 captured. 
The man being depicted is named Pompey and is a servant** of Major Pierson (who was the senior officer on Jersey) and depicts him fighting with his master (which is also bad history). 
So the next time you see the painting you now know the truth.
* Death or Liberty is an informative book about the influence of African-Americans in the Revolutionary War. I haven’t read Black Patriots and Loyalists yet (though I own it), so I can’t comment. 
** In the 18th century the word “servant” was often used as a euphemism for “slave”, though I don’t know if Pompey was a slave or a servant. 

ms1776:

allabouthistory76:

ms1776:

Photos taken of the displays at Valley Forge National Historic Park in Pennsylvania.  I love Hamilton’s short hair in this miniature.  Both his and the miniature of John Laurens were done by Charles Wilson Peale.

The top two pictures are supposed to be Tilghman.  This guy was in a video there explaining what kind of work he and the fellow aides did at headquarters, if I remember correctly.

I love Valley Forge!! 

It was a wonderful exhibit!  I wish I had more time there.  I posted other photographs from my trip there on my blog a while back.  They were tagged as Valley Forge, I think.  

Charles Willson Peale changed his middle name after a long-expected inheritance from the Wilson side of the family (back in Old England) fell through. He decided he would rather be known as a “Willson” than a “Wilson.”

The first picture is Charles Willson Peale, with his wife & daughter. It’s found in Bayou Bend, part of Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts. Visited today, in a lovely period room.

Peale in the uniform of the Philadelphia Associators, 1777. He painted miniatures & larger canvases of many of his comrades in arms. (From the collection of the American Philsophical Society.)

But Peale ensured his place in the history books even earlier, with this 1772 painting—the earliest authenticated portrait of George Washington.

Backcountry onomastics were much like those of the Tidewater South. But in another curious naming custom, the backsettlers went their own way. From an early date they cultivated a spirit of onomastic individualism, sometimes with bizarre results. One famous border family of high status in the backcountry were the Hoggs, who later became one of richest and most cultivated families in Texas. One daughter, a lady of taste and refinement, was named Ima Hogg by her proud parents.

From David Hackett Fischer’s Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America Oxford University Press.

.

Ima Hogg (1882-1975) is well known in Texas—and not just for her name. Her father was Governor but her family’s great wealth came after his death—when oil was discovered on the family plantation. It is said that she & her brothers felt the oil money should go to the people of Texas, since they did not “earn” it.

Miss Hogg studied music in Europe & later helped found the Houston Symphony Orchestra. She suffered from depression in her youth; mental health was another cause she supported. She (& her brothers) collected art—and her former home & garden is now part of Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts.

(Onomastics is the study of proper names.)

Visited Bayou Bend today—the collection of American antiques & art left to Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts by philanthropist Ima Hogg.  The gardens are famous but July is not the time for strenuous outdoor activities in this part of the world. So I toured the collection indoors…
Miss Hogg collected American things back when most newly wealthy Texans were filling their homes with gilt-encrusted monstrosities from Europe. Each room in her former home is devoted to a different period—from the 17th century to a touch of High Victorian.  This 1804 engraving by William Rollinson was tucked into a corner in a Very Early 19th Century room.

Visited Bayou Bend today—the collection of American antiques & art left to Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts by philanthropist Ima Hogg. The gardens are famous but July is not the time for strenuous outdoor activities in this part of the world. So I toured the collection indoors…

Miss Hogg collected American things back when most newly wealthy Texans were filling their homes with gilt-encrusted monstrosities from Europe. Each room in her former home is devoted to a different period—from the 17th century to a touch of High Victorian. This 1804 engraving by William Rollinson was tucked into a corner in a Very Early 19th Century room.

songstersmiscellany:

michaelaross:

The Remarkable Detective Noble: Former Slave, Drummer Boy, Union Soldier, and Trailblazing Sleuth. 
In mid-July 1870, the lead detective in the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case, John Baptiste Jourdain, received a tip that a former slave named Rosa Lee knew of the whereabouts of the kidnappers he sought. Because policemen were “invariably met with silence and suspicion” in black neighborhoods, Jourdain hoped he could dress in workman’s clothes and trick Lee into divulging what she knew about the case. As a light-skinned Creole of color from a privileged background,  Jourdain would need to play his role well by adopting the mannerisms of a freedman. To lend authenticity to his disguise, Jourdain brought along gray-haired Detective Jordan Noble who, at age seventy-two, was the oldest man on the force and one of the few former slaves in the ranks of the Metropolitan Police.
Detective Noble was famous in New Orleans and perhaps an odd choice for an undercover assignment. Born into slavery in Georgia, Noble had earned his freedom after serving as Andrew Jackson’s drummer boy at the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. He later accompanied Louisiana troops in the Everglades during the Seminole War, as well as serving as drummer for the elite New Orleans-based Washington Artillery during the Mexican War. In the 1850s, Noble regularly marched with his drum in patriotic parades alongside white veterans who nicknamed him “Old Jordan.” When the Civil War began, he helped organize one of the regiments that volunteered to fight with the Confederacy, but he later switched sides and served in the Union ranks. Like Jourdain, Noble seized the opportunity during Reconstruction to join the Metropolitan Police as a detective, and despite Noble’s celebrity Jourdain believed that he and Noble, like the famous French detectives they emulated, could be “masters of disguise.”
Dressed in grubby work clothes, the two detectives made their way to the neighborhood near the back-swamps where Rosa Lee lived. When they found her standing outside of her house, the detectives’ deception began.

Love this series on policing/being a detective in the Reconstruction-era South.  You’ll note the complexity of Noble’s history: his decision to first support the Confederacy and then decisively stand behind the Union after emancipation increasingly became a goal and then a reality. 

Fascinating. This could make an excellent TV series, if well done..

songstersmiscellany:

michaelaross:

The Remarkable Detective Noble: Former Slave, Drummer Boy, Union Soldier, and Trailblazing Sleuth.

In mid-July 1870, the lead detective in the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case, John Baptiste Jourdain, received a tip that a former slave named Rosa Lee knew of the whereabouts of the kidnappers he sought. Because policemen were “invariably met with silence and suspicion” in black neighborhoods, Jourdain hoped he could dress in workman’s clothes and trick Lee into divulging what she knew about the case. As a light-skinned Creole of color from a privileged background,  Jourdain would need to play his role well by adopting the mannerisms of a freedman. To lend authenticity to his disguise, Jourdain brought along gray-haired Detective Jordan Noble who, at age seventy-two, was the oldest man on the force and one of the few former slaves in the ranks of the Metropolitan Police.

Detective Noble was famous in New Orleans and perhaps an odd choice for an undercover assignment. Born into slavery in Georgia, Noble had earned his freedom after serving as Andrew Jackson’s drummer boy at the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. He later accompanied Louisiana troops in the Everglades during the Seminole War, as well as serving as drummer for the elite New Orleans-based Washington Artillery during the Mexican War. In the 1850s, Noble regularly marched with his drum in patriotic parades alongside white veterans who nicknamed him “Old Jordan.” When the Civil War began, he helped organize one of the regiments that volunteered to fight with the Confederacy, but he later switched sides and served in the Union ranks. Like Jourdain, Noble seized the opportunity during Reconstruction to join the Metropolitan Police as a detective, and despite Noble’s celebrity Jourdain believed that he and Noble, like the famous French detectives they emulated, could be “masters of disguise.”

Dressed in grubby work clothes, the two detectives made their way to the neighborhood near the back-swamps where Rosa Lee lived. When they found her standing outside of her house, the detectives’ deception began.

Love this series on policing/being a detective in the Reconstruction-era South.  You’ll note the complexity of Noble’s history: his decision to first support the Confederacy and then decisively stand behind the Union after emancipation increasingly became a goal and then a reality. 

Fascinating. This could make an excellent TV series, if well done..