unvarnished

The people won’t forgive when the future custodian of a broken statue, a stripped wall, a desecrated grave, tells everyone who passes by, ‘Yes-yes, all this was destroyed by the revolution.’ The destroyers wear nihilism like a cockade — they think they destroy because they’re radicals. But they destroy because they’re disappointed conservatives — let down by the ancient dream of a perfect society where circles are squared and conflict is cancelled out. But there is no such place and Utopia is its name. So until we stop killing our way towards it, we won’t be grown up as human beings. Our meaning is in how we live in an imperfect world, in our time. We have no other.

 Tom Stoppard, Salvage (Coast of Utopia Trilogy)

i re-read The Coast of Utopia today and, just, Stoppard’s non-Arcadia and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern works are so underappreciated on tumblr and i would like to try and rectify that.

(i may or may not’ve been specifically looking for this quote for a reason related to something i’m writing for shakespeareandpunk but shhhhh don’t tell her)

(my response)

In 2012, Houston’s Main Street Theater presented the Utopia trilogy. It was only the second US company to produce the plays, after the star studded premiere at Lincoln Center. Main Street is a tiny theater in the round, production values were imaginative but minimal & the cast was local/regional—ranging from pretty good to quite excellent.

It was a privilege to see. Was it sad because all those hopes for a free Russia are, after all these years, still a distant dream? Yes. But we got to hear those words of hope….

(Source: sea-change, via setnet)

feistyphocion:

I wasn’t allowed to take pictures in the National Archives, of course, but these are the murals from the rotunda.  I know I’ve said a lot about Toga Washington and Toga Seward before, but there are some real gems here and we especially need to talk about

cape-wearing, sword-wielding Alexander Hamilton.

Hamilton & Washington both carry swords, which probably symbolize military service. Here’s a key to the Constitution Mural; were there other veterans in attendance?

The National Archives’ offers notes on the Founding Fathers. We learn of Hamilton’s later conflicts with Jefferson & Madison—over his “disdain for the common man.” Yes, those two rich kids, supported all their lives by inherited wealth (much of it human) were true representatives of the lowly common folk! Then, there’s Hamilton’s “sympathies for Great Britain.” How dare he prefer trade with the Empire to another war? How many cannon had Jefferson & Madison fired in their careers?

Still, they are lovely murals. The first link leads to information on their recent restoration.

silentambassadors:

On this date in 1891, Big Jim Hogg took office as the first native-born Texan to be elected governor.  An auspicious day for Texas!…..and for urban-myth-mongers!  Well, it is true, true indeed, unfortunately true, alas too true, that he had a wee girl-child and named her Ima.  But it is myth, pure myth!, that she had a sister named Ura!  So it was just Ima Hogg on her own who had to deal with the consequences of such misfortunate nomenclature.  Poor sweet Ima Hogg.  And her imaginary sister, Ura Hogg.  [For those Texas enthusiasts out there, have a think on pre-ordering the new Lydia Mendoza, “La Alondra de la Frontera,” stamps from usps.com!]

Stamp details:
Top left:
Issued on: June 16, 1995
From: Austin, TX
Designed by: Laura Smith
SC #2968

Top right:
Issued on: April 4, 2002
From: The United States of America
Designed by: Richard Sheaff
Illustrated by: Lonnie Busch
SC #3603

Stamp on bottom:
Issued on: March 8, 2013
From: San Antonio, TX
Designed by: Neal Ashby, Patrick Donohue
SC #4786

(Source: arago.si.edu)

What a Hogg

badasscivilwarbeards:

image

This is Big Jim Hogg, who is most famous for naming his daughter Ima Hogg. He might not win a prize for being the best father, but his chances of winning one for his beard are much better. 

Jim Hogg had a wise provision in his will—he directed that the family plantation could not be sold until 15 years after his death. The kids wanted to unload the old place but had to wait. Just long enough for oil to be discovered. The family had been prosperous & respected—but not rich, rich, rich.

It’s said that his sons & his daughter Ima felt the oil money was not “theirs”—so they embarked on some serious philanthropy.

(Oh, and Go Razorbacks! Hogg Intermediate is in my neighborhood.)

(Source: Wikipedia)

oh this is gonna be freaking awesome ( in so many ways )

cerulean-spork:

so i guess in the comicon flood nobody noticed the maybe-not-just-a-rumour that idris elba is gonna play sir bedivere in guy ritchies upcomin KING ARTHUR movie , eh ??

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/idris-elba-talks-guy-ritchies-719976

i am trying so hard to be good here , you…

(my bold)

also the HILARITY ENSUES as racist fandom demonstrates how little familiarity it has w the source materials SUCH AS THEY ARE , aka a chaotic mess that makes DC continuity look simple , & attempts to call THE MATTER OF BRITAIN a historical reality like the wars of the roses lol

Really, some of these nerds need to get lost in the woods of the Arthurian thing. They might emerge, eventually—much wiser if still bewildered…

jumblepusher:

Mick Rock. “Andy Warhol as Father Christmas, embracing Truman Capote”. 1979. New York, NY, USA. (Andy Warhol & Truman Capote, High Times).

jumblepusher:

Mick Rock. “Andy Warhol as Father Christmas, embracing Truman Capote”. 1979. New York, NY, USA. (Andy Warhol & Truman Capote, High Times).

ooblium:

Selections from the Golden Dawn Notebooks by W.B. Yeats

The Order of the Golden Dawn, which WBY joined on 7 March 1890, was a society dedicated to the study of Rosicrucianism and ritual magic. (Rosicrucianism was a seventeenth century movement, based on Christianity, which gave rise to several secret organizations devoted to alchemy, mysticism, and esoteric spiritual beliefs). 

The Order evolved an elaborate system of symbols and rituals and also an elaborate hierarchy — members studied and underwent examinations to move from level to level. They used Tarot cards to prognosticate about the future, performed magical ceremonies to access archetypes and in some instances deities, and engaged in the practice of magic. 

During the 1890s, the organization, which was based in London, had over 300 members. These included WBY, his uncle George Pollexfen, Maud Gonne, Florence Farr, Annie Horniman  and Georgina Hyde-Lees, who later became WBY’s wife.

(via lemonsharks)

medievalpoc:

distant-relatives-blog:

 The University of Sankoré, or Sankore Masjid is one of three ancient centers of learning located in TimbuktuMaliWest Africa. The three mosques of Sankoré, Djinguereber Mosque and Sidi Yahya compose the famous University of Timbuktu. During the 14th -16th century, Sankore University enrolled more foreigen students than New York University today. 

The Mali Empire gained direct control over the city of Timbuktu in 1324 during the reign of Mansa Kankou Musa also known as Musa I “King of Kings”. He designed and saw the construction of one of Sankore’s first great mosques and the Jingeray Ber Masjid in 1327.The foundations of the previous structure were laid around 988 A.D. on the orders of the city’s chief judge Al-Qadi Aqib ibn Mahmud ibn Umar. A local mandinka lady, esteemed for her wealth, financed his plans to turn Sankoré into a world class learning institution. 

By the end of Mansa Musa’s reign (early 14th century CE), the Sankoré Masjid had been converted into a fully staffed Madrassa (Islamic school or in this case university) with the largest collections of books in Africa since the Library of Alexandria. The level of learning at Timbuktu’s Sankoré University was superior to that of all other Islamic centers in the world. The Sankoré Masjid was capable of housing 25,000 students and had one of the largest libraries in the world with between 400,000 to 700,000 manuscripts.

Today, the intellectual legacy of Timbuktu is neglected in historical discourse. These pages of WORLD history tend to get ripped out.   

Learn more about the surviving manuscripts of the library of Timbuktu and its fate here.

(via bythegods)