unvarnished

endalldisease:

Christopher Columbus: The Raping, Murdering, Enslaving, Genocidal Pedophile - The latest of The Oatmeal makes a pretty compelling case for a historical summersault of opinion about Christopher Columbus, and that his achievements (“discovering” America, sailing from Europe to America, proving the curvature of the Earth) are all BS.

More importantly, though, is… (central banking, christopher columbus, columbus day, discovered america, founding fathers, genocide, NWO)


"central banking"? How does this fit into your list of atrocities?

endalldisease:

Christopher Columbus: The Raping, Murdering, Enslaving, Genocidal Pedophile - The latest of The Oatmeal makes a pretty compelling case for a historical summersault of opinion about Christopher Columbus, and that his achievements (“discovering” America, sailing from Europe to America, proving the curvature of the Earth) are all BS.

More importantly, though, is… (central banking, christopher columbus, columbus day, discovered america, founding fathers, genocide, NWO)

"central banking"? How does this fit into your list of atrocities?

Eternal vigilance by the people is the price of liberty.

—Andrew Jackson (via brianjohnspencer)

A quick search on this quotation took me to the Spurious Quotations site at Monticello; the saying is apparently often attributed to Jefferson. But there’s no evidence he said (or wrote) this. It is probably a paraphrase of a statement by John Philpot Curran.

Andrew Jackson did not say this, either.

historysisco:

On this day in History October 20, 1803: By a vote of 24-to-7, the United States Senate ratifies a treaty with France which resulted in the Louisiana Purchase. From what started with an attempt to purchase the city of New Orleans, the transaction proved invaluable. As you can see from the map above, the treaty led to the acquisition of land that doubled in size of the United States, adding territory that would become the states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and parts of Minnesota, New Mexico, Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado. 

The price that was decided for the purchase of the land was $15 million dollars which resulted in the The United States acquiring approximately 827,000 square miles of land west of the Mississippi River.

For Further Reading:

Given Jefferson’s strict interpretation of the Constitution, it’s interesting to see how linked sources describe this rather loose action.

From Monticello:

Exact boundaries would have to be negotiated with Spain and England and so would not be set for several years, and Jefferson’s Cabinet members argued that the constitutional amendment he proposed was not necessary. As time for ratification of the purchase treaty grew short, Jefferson accepted his Cabinet’s counsel and rationalized: “It is the case of a guardian, investing the money of his ward in purchasing an important adjacent territory; and saying to him when of age, I did this for your good.”

From the Bill of Rights Institute:

Jefferson had always feared the costs of loose construction of the powers delegated to the national government in the Constitution, and the Constitution did not provide for the incorporation of new lands into the U.S. Jefferson urged bringing the issue to the people to approve with a constitutional amendment, but a special session of Congress disregarded his draft amendment. The Senate ratified the Louisiana Purchase Treaty in October of 1803. While Jefferson did his best to follow what he believed was proper constitutional procedure, not enough of his contemporaries agreed with him and he eventually assented.

The second account makes it seem TJ was forced instead of convinced. Here’s what Sourcewatch has to say about the source:

The Bill of Rights Institute, established in September 1999 by the Charles G. Koch Foundation, is a Virginia based nonprofit launched by Koch Family Foundations that promotes a teaching a conservative interpretation of the Constitution in schools.

You learn something new every day!

h3llbetty:

Webb Pierce, Faron Young, Little Jimmy Dickens, Carl Smith and Ray Price.

h3llbetty:

Webb Pierce, Faron Young, Little Jimmy Dickens, Carl Smith and Ray Price.

(via countryhixs)

oupacademic:

Otranto is a novel of passion and terror, of human identity at the edge of sanity.”

How The Castle of Otranto, dubbed “the first Gothic novel,” inspired new interpretations of the Gothic in literature, art, and film.

Images: The Nightmare by Henry Fuseli, 1781. Public Domain via Wikiart. Cabinet of Dr Caligari Lobby Card (1920). Goldwyn Distributing Company. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula, from Dracula, 1931. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

mobylosangelesarchitecture:

ok, i admit it, i’ve been slacking on my architecture updates. i’m sorry. i’m sure i blame something, or i’d like to, but it’s just being busy. and maybe lazy. or busy. or both. which seems paradoxical.

BUT! today i have some utterly oddball architecture from sacramento. it’s a ziggurat made out of gold. or maybe just a ziggurat lit in gold lights. or maybe just a temple. a giant temple. i have no idea what it is.

i was en route to a rave and i saw this giant glowing golden ziggurat and i jumped out of the car and took pictures of it and jumped back into the car and dj’ed at the rave and everyone seemed pretty happy which is good especially when you factor in run on sentences.

so. a modern ziggurat gold temple seen en route a rave. architecture at it’s finest. i mean, just look at it. wouldn’t you jump out of a car en route to a rave to take pictures of this amazing oddball spaceship temple in the trees?

thanks

moby

profkew:

A proposed statue for the National Liberty Memorial, honoring the African American soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War, sculpted by artist David Newton of Dallas. (Michael Curtis)
Memorial for black Revolutionary War soldiers finds spot on Mall after 30 years

Maurice Barboza’s idea to build a memorial to black Revolutionary War soldiers on the Mall was sparked by the end of another struggle: the campaign by Barboza’s aunt to be the second black member of the Daughters of the American Revolution in modern times. She won.
That was 1984. Over the next 30 years, Barboza, inspired by his aunt’s tenacity, patiently shepherded the idea of a “black Patriots memorial” through the stages of historical research, development of a monument and then congressional legislation. The longtime Alexandria resident even sold his house to raise money and focus on the project.
And now, he may have won.
Last month, Congress unanimously authorized a site for the memorial: the northeast corner of 14th Street and Independence Avenue, a main gateway to the city, in what is currently a surface parking lot next to the Department of Agriculture. And on Sept. 26, President Obama signed the authorization into law. The National Liberty Memorial was formally approved for placement on the Mall.
“It’s been a long struggle,” Barboza said. “Each step of the way was met with resistance. I’m just so gratified that so many people have bought into this, and it’s given me a great deal of peace to move forward and create a great memorial.”
Barboza’s mission is to raise awareness about the role of African Americans in the Revolutionary War. At least 5,000 black soldiers, and possibly as many as 10,000, fought for independence from the British. Some were free and many were slaves, Barboza said, some enticed with false promises of their own freedom.
Read more.


ht @learothawms
 

profkew:

A proposed statue for the National Liberty Memorial, honoring the African American soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War, sculpted by artist David Newton of Dallas. (Michael Curtis)

Memorial for black Revolutionary War soldiers finds spot on Mall after 30 years

Maurice Barboza’s idea to build a memorial to black Revolutionary War soldiers on the Mall was sparked by the end of another struggle: the campaign by Barboza’s aunt to be the second black member of the Daughters of the American Revolution in modern times. She won.

That was 1984. Over the next 30 years, Barboza, inspired by his aunt’s tenacity, patiently shepherded the idea of a “black Patriots memorial” through the stages of historical research, development of a monument and then congressional legislation. The longtime Alexandria resident even sold his house to raise money and focus on the project.

And now, he may have won.

Last month, Congress unanimously authorized a site for the memorial: the northeast corner of 14th Street and Independence Avenue, a main gateway to the city, in what is currently a surface parking lot next to the Department of Agriculture. And on Sept. 26, President Obama signed the authorization into law. The National Liberty Memorial was formally approved for placement on the Mall.

“It’s been a long struggle,” Barboza said. “Each step of the way was met with resistance. I’m just so gratified that so many people have bought into this, and it’s given me a great deal of peace to move forward and create a great memorial.”

Barboza’s mission is to raise awareness about the role of African Americans in the Revolutionary War. At least 5,000 black soldiers, and possibly as many as 10,000, fought for independence from the British. Some were free and many were slaves, Barboza said, some enticed with false promises of their own freedom.

Read more.

ht 

 

thesenioritis:


Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.
-Alexander Hamilton

Happy Monday!



Quote Investigator hunted this one down.   
The earliest evidence of close match known to QI was published in the January 1945 issue of a journal called “Mental Hygiene”. At the time of publication World War II was still being fought. The adage appeared in an article by the medical doctor Gordon A. Eadie titled “The Over-All Mental-Health Needs of the Industrial Plant, with Special Reference to War Veterans”. Boldface has been added to excerpts: 
We are trying to show him not only what we are fighting against, but what we are fighting for. So many of these boys have only a very hazy idea of the real issues of the war. About all they see is “going back to the good old days.” This is a dangerous state. If they don’t stand for something, they will fall for anything. They need to realize that we are fighting two wars—the war of arms and the war of ideas—that other war of which the war of arms is one phase.

The important reference work “The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs” from Yale University Press has an entry for this adage and points to the same journal and year for its earliest citation. 
Apparently a British journalist named “Alex Hamilton” (not related to Our Hamilton) also used the phrase—which may have caused the current confusion.
The Online Etymology Dictionary is also useful for investigating suspiciously modern phrases; “fall for” dates back to 1903.

thesenioritis:

Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.

-Alexander Hamilton

Happy Monday!

Quote Investigator hunted this one down.

The earliest evidence of close match known to QI was published in the January 1945 issue of a journal called “Mental Hygiene”. At the time of publication World War II was still being fought. The adage appeared in an article by the medical doctor Gordon A. Eadie titled “The Over-All Mental-Health Needs of the Industrial Plant, with Special Reference to War Veterans”. Boldface has been added to excerpts:

We are trying to show him not only what we are fighting against, but what we are fighting for. So many of these boys have only a very hazy idea of the real issues of the war. About all they see is “going back to the good old days.” This is a dangerous state. If they don’t stand for something, they will fall for anything. They need to realize that we are fighting two wars—the war of arms and the war of ideas—that other war of which the war of arms is one phase.

The important reference work “The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs” from Yale University Press has an entry for this adage and points to the same journal and year for its earliest citation.

Apparently a British journalist named “Alex Hamilton” (not related to Our Hamilton) also used the phrase—which may have caused the current confusion.

The Online Etymology Dictionary is also useful for investigating suspiciously modern phrases; “fall for” dates back to 1903.

thecivilwarparlor:

Sylvester Magee 1841-1970 (Last Living American Slave Died At 130 Years Old) Also Served In The Civil War.. With Audio Recording Of  Mr MaGee

Sylvester MaGee said he was 130 years old when he died in 1971. He also said he’d been a slave, and that he’d fought for both the Federal and Rebel sides during the Civil War (his Confederate service was involuntary). MaGee’s claims could never be verified, which perhaps explains why he was buried in an unmarked grave until 2012. That’s when the county historical society rediscovered the long-dead local celebrity, and placed a one-ton granite slab over his final resting place. A tall headstone, the biggest in its small churchyard cemetery, now marks the spot.

Sylvester Magee was captured in this footage by historian Mike Mulhern at a South Mississippi nursing home during the summer of 1970. Using his Super 8 camera, Mulhern films Magee as he signs a print of the Vicksburg siege, as well as an application for veteran’s benefits. In the film, Magee also points to a scar on his forearm which he claimed was caused by a wartime wound. This is believed to be the last film of Magee before his death during the fall of 1971…

VIDEO https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V49BY9ogiDM (turn down the music)

He had no birth certificate, but chancery court records in Covington County list him and his father as being passed on to the next of kin when their owner died in 1859. Mr. Magee always insisted his birthday was May 29th, 1841. Now as if being 130 years old when he died weren’t enough, there are a couple of OTHER significant details about his life and death that sets him apart. Not only was he that old, but he was the last American slave to die. And, because he did service with the Union Army in the siege of Vicksburg, he was the last Union Veteran to die.

And since he started the war as an arms bearer to his master on the side of the South, he is perhaps also the last confederate veteran to die. Story by http://www.msnewsnow.com/story/16593702/sylvester-magees-unmarked-grave

He’s listed in the book “Black Confederates.” His accounts of the Union Army crossing the Big Black River after the Battle of Champion Hill on their way into Vicksburg convinced historian A. P. Andrews he had to have been there, since Mr. Magee couldn’t read or write. How else could he have known all the minute details and names of the officers?

Reposted from http://www.roadsideamerica.com/story/32745

(via southcarolinadove)

wwfandomw:

The Princess Bride: 5 Inconceivable Sundaes

1: The Six Fingered Man 

  • First Street Vanilla Bean Ice Cream
  • Real Maple Syrup
  • Heavy Whipped Cream
  • Six-fingered Pepper Bacon Hand

2: The Crazy Sicilian

  • First Street Chocolate Ice Cream
  • Heavy Whipped Cream
  • Drizzle of Italian Citrus Olive Oil
  • Biscotti Crumbles
  • Iocane Powder (Sea Salt)
  • Served in a Silver Goblet

3: The Man in Black

  • First Street Chocolate Ice Cream
  • Semisweet Chocolate Chips
  • Chocolate Sauce
  • Black Jelly Beans

4: The Princess Butter-Cup

  • First Street Butter Pecan Ice Cream
  • Pretzel Crumbles
  • Peanut Butter Chips
  • Caramel Sauce
  • Salty Tears (A sprinkling of sea salt)
  • Serve in a a porcelain cup
  • with a Jeweled Crown

5:  The Fire Swamp

  • First Street Chocolate Ice Cream
  • Heavy Whipped Cream
  • Chocolate Sauce
  • Hot Tamale Candies (Flame Spurts)
  • Heavy Whipped Cream
  • Graham Cracker Crumbs (Lightening Sand)
  • Optional:  Large Gummi Rat

6: The Heath Cliffs of Insanity

  • First Street Vanilla Bean Ice Cream
  • Heavy Whipped Cream
  • Mocha Fudge Topping
  • Crumbled Heath Bars

7: The Holocaust Cloak

  • 3 Scoops First Street Chocolate Ice Cream,
  • stacked and frozen on top of one another
  • and covered in Magic Shell;
  • Surrounded by Bacardi 151 soaked honey peanuts
  • in a wooden cart and lit aflame.
  • Highly flammable — dangerous — and not at all recommended

(Source: rookno17.com, via troublesmysight)